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Other Types of Complaints

Charter flights

Charter carriers and scheduled carriers operate differently and this results in a distinction in how the Agency's jurisdiction applies to them.

If your complaint is about the air portion of a travel package purchased through a travel agent or a tour operator, then you may contact the Agency. The Agency will try to resolve complaints on issues in respect of a charter carrier's service where a consumer has already complained to the carrier and is not satisfied with the carrier's response. The Agency also has jurisdiction over the rules governing lost, delayed or damaged luggage, flight delays, denied boarding (bumping), etc.

Complaints about the land portion of the package or services offered by the tour operator come under provincial jurisdiction and should be addressed to your provincial / territorial office dealing with consumer matters including travel.

Tour operators

Complaints about the land portion of the package or services offered by the tour operator come under provincial jurisdiction and should be addressed to your provincial / territorial office dealing with consumer matters including travel.

Problems in airport terminals

Your complaints should be sent directly to the airport authority responsible for the airport where you encountered your problem.

If the problem relates to accessibility issues, you may visit the Disability-Related Complaints section of the Agency's Web site. This section provides more information about the Agency's informal and formal complaints processes.

Unfair competitive practices

The Competition Bureau is responsible for handling complaints in respect of unfair competitive practices, mergers/acquisitions or predatory behaviour involving air carriers operating in Canada.

Bilingual services

Air Canada and its affiliates are the only air carriers subject to the terms of Canada's Official Languages Act. If you have a complaint regarding language issues for any carrier, you should first contact the carrier involved. However, if you wish to pursue the issue, and it concerns Air Canada and/or its affiliates, you may also complain to the Commissioner of Official Languages.

Loyalty programs

The rules governing a carrier's travel loyalty program (also known as frequent flyer programs) must be contained in its tariff. Complaints should be first taken to the carrier or organization providing the program. However, if you are not satisfied with their response, the matter can be brought to the Agency.

Certain loyalty and frequent shopper programs such as Aeroplan and Air Miles are run by corporations that are independent of air carriers, therefore transactions made with these companies are private and contractual in nature and are not part of the Agency's jurisdiction.

Problems with foreign air carriers

Complaints against foreign air carriers which offer transportation to or from Canada may be filed with the Agency once you are not satisfied with the outcome of your attempts to resolve the matter directly with the carrier in writing (visit the Agency's Air Travel Complaints Process for more information).

Safety

Matters relating to safety on board aircraft should be brought to the attention of Transport Canada at:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/commerce/CabinSafety/menu.htm.