Departmental Results Report 2016–2017

Table of Contents

Message from the Chair and Chief Executive Officer

It is my pleasure to provide Parliamentarians and Canadians with this report on the Canadian Transportation Agency's (CTA) activities and results in 2016-2017.

It was a busy and productive year for the CTA, Canada's longest-standing independent, expert tribunal and regulator. In May 2016, we launched the Regulatory Modernization Initiative (RMI), an ambitious review of all regulations the CTA administers to ensure that they are up-to-date with current business models, shippers' and travellers' expectations, and best practices in the regulatory field. The RMI's first consultation phase focused on accessible transportation and involved more than 30 face-to-face meetings and 200 written submissions. Our plan is to complete all consultations, regulatory drafting, and approvals before the end of 2018.

In fall 2016, the CTA undertook targeted public information activities to help ensure that the people Parliament intended as beneficiaries of the CTA's services actually know we're here to help. These efforts contributed to a dramatic rise in the number of individuals seeking the CTA's assistance, particularly with respect to air travel and accessible transportation issues: in 2016-2017, we received an average of nearly 300 air travel complaints per month, a growth of over 300 per cent from 2015-2016, and we resolved 69 complaints from travellers with disabilities regarding accessibility issues – an increase of 50% from 2015–2016.

In October 2016, the CTA returned to holding oral hearings for select cases after a hiatus of nine years. And in the first few months of 2017, we articulated the four strategic priorities that will help us focus our energies between now and 2020: a modern framework, excellence in service delivery, public and stakeholder awareness, and a healthy and high-performing organization.

The fact that we got all this – and much more – done during 2016-2017 is a tribute to the professionalism and dedication of the CTA team, which is comprised of five Members and 220 public servants. Their expertise and hard work help foster an efficient, competitive, and accessible national transportation system that supports the economic and social well-being of Canadians. We are proud of what we accomplished in 2016-2017 and excited by the challenges before us.

Scott Streiner
Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Results at a glance

For more information on the CTA’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

In 2016-2017, the CTA:

Implemented a targeted public awareness campaign using print, radio, social media, web advertising as well as outreach efforts by the Chair and CEO. Subsequently, the CTA observed an increase in the average number of complaints received per month from 64 (over the previous four years) to nearly 300 which the CTA largely dealt with through productivity gains as a result of process improvements and temporary re-allocation of resources.

Launched the Regulatory Modernization Initiative, with the goals of reviewing all regulations administered by the CTA and bringing them in line with contemporary business models, user expectations, and best practices in the regulatory field.

Reinstated oral hearings for the first time in nine years. Oral hearings enhance the transparency of the adjudicative process while generally offering greater efficiency.

Established a two-stage program for tracking and verifying insurance filings submitted under the Safe and Accountable Rail Act.


What funds were used?
26,948,077
Actual Spending


Who was involved?
220
Actual FTEs

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

The Canadian Transportation Agency is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal and regulator. It plays a unique role with respect to the national transportation system.

Mandate and role

The CTA has three mandates:

  • It helps ensure that the national transportation system runs efficiently and smoothly in the economic and social interests of all Canadians, including those who work and invest in it; the producers, shippers, travellers and businesses who rely on it; and the communities where it operates.
  • It protects the human right of persons with disabilities to an accessible transportation network.
  • It provides consumer protection for air passengers.

To help advance these mandates, the CTA has three tools at its disposal:

  • Rule-making: It develops and applies ground rules that establish the rights and responsibilities of transportation service providers and users and that level the playing field among competitors. These rules can take the form of binding regulations or less formal guidelines, codes of practice or interpretation notes.
  • Dispute resolution: It resolves disputes that arise between transportation providers on the one hand and their clients and neighbours on the other, using a range of tools from facilitation and mediation to arbitration and adjudication.
  • Information provision: It provides information on the transportation system, the rights and responsibilities of transportation providers and users, as well as its services.

For more general information about the CTA, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report. Further information on the organization's role, mission and mandate is available on the CTA's website.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

The CTA's budget allocation has remained essentially flat for the past decade. During this time, the CTA has assumed new mandates including:

  • Enhanced powers regarding railway line transfers and discontinuance, and net salvage value determinations;
  • Formalized authority to mediate and arbitrate various types of disputes, including new arbitration services for shippers and railway companies on rail level of service and the authority to develop new related regulations;
  • Authority to resolve rail noise and vibration complaints;
  • Implementing and administering regulations to enable the travelling public to easily determine the total advertised air price and to promote fair competition between advertisers in the air travel industry;
  • Expanded authority regarding air carriers' communication and application of their terms and conditions of carriage;
  • Authority to resolve disputes related to the use by public passenger service providers of federal railway companies’ railway, land, equipment, facilities or services, including the conditions of or amount to be paid for that use;
  • Carrying out responsibilities related to the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act, including providing advice on the amount of grain to be moved in Western Canada and developing new related regulations; and
  • Carrying out responsibilities related to the Safe and Accountable Rail Act, including applying more stringent rail insurance requirements and handling applications by provinces and municipalities seeking reimbursement of expenses reasonably incurred in responding to fires resulting from rail operations.

In addition, the CTA is dealing with a dramatic increase in the volume of air travel complaints.

Key risks

Newly assumed mandates and the increasing volume of air travel complaints have created pressures on the limited resources within the CTA. The CTA has improved processes, increased efficiency and productivity,  and is temporarily re-allocating resources, all of which has permitted the CTA to largely manage the increase in volume of air travel complaints while delivering on both newly assumed and existing mandates.

Modernization initiatives within the CTA employed enhanced project management practices and temporary resource re-allocation to ensure initiatives progressed as expected internally. Outside factors have forced modifications to timelines and project delivery expectations for some of these modernization initiatives, resulting, for example, in delays in implementing Workplace 2.0 and a new shared case management system.

As the CTA's mandates continue to increase, receiving no new funding to execute both new and existing mandates introduces risks with regards to resources that are operating near limits which cannot be sustained.

Key Risks
Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the Agency’s Priorities

Increased demand on the CTA’s limited existing resources to administer additional new mandates in addition to its existing core business functions

Mitigation Strategies:

  • Maintain an up-to-date risk management framework and corporate risk profile to facilitate monitoring and reporting.
  • Integrate planning, priority setting, and financial decision-making to strategically manage pressures.
  • Explore cost recovery models appropriate for quasi-judicial and regulatory bodies.
  • Make organizational adjustments to realign functions to reinforce current priorities.

Effectiveness:

The CTA largely managed a dramatic increase in air travel complaints within its existing budget allocation.

Excellence in service delivery

Increased demand on limited existing resources to implement modernization initiatives such as the shared case management system and Workplace 2.0

Mitigation Strategies:

  • Maintain an up-to-date risk management framework and corporate risk profile to facilitate monitoring and reporting.
  • Integrate planning, priority setting, and financial decision-making to strategically manage pressures.
  • Explore cost recovery models appropriate for quasi-judicial and regulatory bodies.
  • Make organizational adjustments to realign functions to reinforce current priorities.

Effectiveness:

The CTA largely managed a dramatic increase in air travel complaints within its existing budget allocation.

A healthy, high-performing organization

Results: what we achieved

Program 1.1: Economic Regulation

Description

The CTA supports an efficient and accessible federal transportation system for users, service providers and other stakeholders through regulation of federal air, rail and marine transportation. It regulates air transportation by enforcing the Canada Transportation Act and related regulations, administering a licensing and charter permit system, authorizing code share and wet lease arrangements, supporting the negotiation of air bilateral agreements, and ensuring that terms and conditions of carriage of air carriers are consistent with Canadian legislation. It develops regulations and codes of practice to remove undue obstacles to the mobility of persons with disabilities from the federal transportation network. It regulates rail transportation by issuing certificates of fitness and enforcing compliance with minimum insurance requirements consistent with Canadian legislation and regulations. It determines railway costs, approves rail line construction, oversees the discontinuance of service, establishes the net salvage value of rail lines, and determines interswitching rates and the maximum revenue entitlement for the movement of Western grain. It regulates marine transportation by determining whether suitable Canadian vessels are available when applications are made to use foreign vessels.

Results

In 2016-2017, the CTA:

  • Launched the Regulatory Modernization Initiative, with the goals of reviewing all regulations administered by the CTA and bringing them in line with contemporary business models, user expectations, and best practices in the regulatory field.
  • Established a two-stage program for tracking and verifying insurance filings submitted under the Safe and Accountable Rail Act.
  • Developed a risk-based methodology for the Compliance Assurance Program.
  • Engaged with stakeholder groups to increase their understanding of how the CTA determines fully allocated rail costs, as well as their rights and responsibilities under legislation and regulations administered by the CTA related to interswitching.

These results support the CTA's focus on modernizing the regulatory framework and informing transportation providers and users about its services. The full scope of CTA activities supports an efficient, competitive national transportation system.

Results achieved
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–2017 Actual results 2015–2016 Actual results 2014–2015 Actual results
Service providers (air, rail and marine) comply with legislative requirements Percentage of non-compliant air carriers and facility operators that are remedied within 70 days 90% Ongoing 95% N/AFootnote 2 94%
Percentage of air carriers and facility operators complying with regulatory requirements 80% Ongoing 95% N/AFootnote 2 N/AFootnote 2
Level of compliance with targeted accessibility provisions in regulationsFootnote 1 85% April 2017 95% 100% 100%
Level of compliance with targeted accessibility provisions in voluntary codes of practiceFootnote 1 75% April 2017 75% 75% 100%
Percentage of air carriers that amended their International Terms and Conditions of Carriage for passenger services as a result of CTA actions 80% April 2017 100% N/AFootnote 2 N/AFootnote 2
Percentage of air and rail carriers complying with the minimum insurance coverage levels within CTA timelines 95% April 2017 95% N/AFootnote 2 N/AFootnote 2
CN and CP are provided with the information required to ensure they do not exceed the Maximum Revenue Entitlement for the shipment of Western Grain Number of times that either CN or CP has not exceeded their respective Maximum Revenue Entitlement by more than 1% over the last three years Five times out of six times April 2017 Maximum Revenue Entitlements not exceeded by more than 1% in past three years Maximum Revenue Entitlements not exceeded by more than 1% in past three years Maximum Revenue Entitlements not exceeded by more than 1% in past three years
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Main Estimates 2016–2017 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–2017 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,315,866 11,315,866 11,490,649 10,569,836 -746,030
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual Difference
(actual minus planned)
98 90 -8

The variance is primarily due to the amounts carried forward in preparation for potential pressures resulting from the renewal of collective agreements and to fund the workload associated with the increase in air travel complaints.

Information on the Canadian Transportation Agency’s lower-level programs is available on the CTA’s website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 1.2: Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Description

The CTA provides formal and informal dispute resolution services to users, service providers and others affected by the federal transportation network, including facilitation, mediation, arbitration, and adjudication. As a quasi-judicial tribunal, the CTA has the authority to issue adjudicative decisions and orders on matters within its jurisdiction over federally-regulated air, rail and marine modes of transportation and, in respect of the CTA's accessibility mandate, extra-provincial bus operations. It resolves disputes between: air travellers and air carriers regarding terms and conditions of air carriage; persons with disabilities and service providers regarding undue obstacles to the mobility of such persons within the federal transportation network; railway companies, rail shippers, provinces, municipalities and neighbors regarding a wide range of matters including railway level of service, infrastructure, crossings, interswitching, and noise and vibration.

Results

In 2016-2017, the CTA:

  • Implemented a targeted public awareness campaign using print, radio, social media, web advertising as well as outreach efforts by the Chair and CEO. Outreach by the CTA’s Chair and CEO included eight keynote addresses and 18 media interviews.
  • Observed a record volume of air travel complaints where an average of 64 complaints per month (over the previous four years) increased to nearly 300. Increased productivity through improved processes and a temporary re-allocation of resources have permitted the CTA to largely manage this increase in volume.
  • Held its first oral hearing in nine years. Oral hearings enhance the transparency of the adjudicative process while generally offering greater efficiency compared to written pleadings alone, especially in complex cases.
  • Improved service to Canadians in the facilitation process by simplifying forms, processes and messaging, and increasing direct phone contact with Canadians wherever possible.
  • Created a permanent Registrar position to provide a resource dedicated to assisting Canadians to understand the CTA’s Dispute Adjudication Rules and to interact more efficiently and effectively with the CTA.

In parallel with the increased awareness by the Canadian public of the CTA’s services, air travel complaint volumes have continued to rapidly increase and the CTA must continue to improve productivity and timelines in order to keep up with this increasing demand for services.

Results achieved
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–2017 Actual results 2015–2016 Actual results 2014–2015 Actual results
Specialized transportation dispute resolution that is transparent, fair and timely Percentage of rail, air, marine, and accessible disputes facilitated that meet service standards 80% April 2017 74% N/AFootnote 3 N/AFootnote 3
Percentage of rail disputes arbitrated within statutory deadlines (45-65 days or longer, as agreed to by parties) 100% April 2017 100% N/AFootnote 3 N/AFootnote 3
Percentage of rail, air, marine, and accessible disputes mediated within statutory deadline (30 days or longer, as agreed to by parties) 100% April 2017 100% N/AFootnote 3 N/AFootnote 3
Percentage of rail, air, marine, and accessible disputes adjudicated that meet service standards 80% April 2017 71% N/AFootnote 3 N/AFootnote 3
Percentage of undisputed coasting trade applications processed prior to the requested date of service commencement 95% April 2017 97% N/AFootnote 3 N/AFootnote 3
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Main Estimates 2016–2017 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–2017 Difference (actual minus planned)
9,253,556 9,253,556 9,416,993 8,969,209 -284,347
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual Difference
(actual minus planned)
75 72 -3

The variance is primarily due to the amounts carried forward in preparation for potential pressures resulting from the renewal of collective agreements and to fund the workload associated with the increase in air travel complaints.

Information on the Canadian Transportation Agency’s lower-level programs is available on the CTA’s website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

In 2016-2017, the CTA:

  • Improved people management through the CTA's On the Move Action Plan, including implementing staff performance feedback tools, recognition programs, mental health initiatives and the assignment of a Champion for collaboration and innovation.
  • Improved internal transparency and dialogue through regular all-staff Town Hall meetings which ensure understanding of strategic direction and support onboarding of new employees.
  • Strengthened financial management practices through enhanced monitoring, with a particular focus on monitoring financial targets linked to management responsibilities.

These activities served to motivate and align front-line staff to focus their efforts on delivering results for industry, travellers (including persons with disabilities), shippers and other users of the national transportation system.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Main Estimates 2016–2017 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–2017 Difference (actual minus planned)
7,222,665 7,222,665 7,388,682 7,409,032 186,367
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual Difference
(actual minus planned)
57 58 1

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph
  • Details
    Departmental Spending Trend Graph ($ thousands)
      2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
    Sunset Programs - Anticipated - - - - - -
    Statutory 3,230 3,231 3,079 3,199 3,199 3,199
    Voted 25,548 25,023 23,869 27,715 23,958 23,958
    Total 28,778 28,254 26,948 30,914 27,157 27,157

For fiscal years 2014-2015, 2015-2016 and 2016-2017, the amounts shown represent the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts.

For fiscal year 2017-2018, the planned spending reflects increased funding of $3.5 million approved through the Main Estimates to pay for the costs related to the Government of Canada Workplace 2.0 Fit-up Standards. This amount is reflected under Internal Services Program and will be reimbursed over a period of 15 years.

For the period 2018-2019 to 2019-2020, the planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the CTA's Strategic Outcome and Programs. These expenditures vary slightly in previous years as they do not include the reimbursement of eligible paylist expenditures and budget carry forwards as these cannot be estimated with certainty.

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)

Strategic Outcome: 1. Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system
Programs and Internal Services 2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned spending
2017–2018
Planned spending
2018–2019
Planned spending
2016–2017
Total authorities available for use
2016–2017
Actual spending (authorities used)
2015–2016 Actual spending (authorities used) 2014–2015
Actual spending (authorities used)
1.1 Economic Regulation 11,315,866 11,315,866 11,532,859 11,429,543 11,490,649 10,569,836 11,099,602 11,306,027
1.2 Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 9,253,556 9,253,556 8,703,153 8,635,058 9,416,993 8,969,209 10,334,836 10,984,842
Subtotal 20,569,422 20,569,422 20,236,012 20,064,601 20,907,642 19,539,045 21,434,438 22,290,869
1.3 Internal Services 7,222,665 7,222,665 10,678,154 7,092,619 7,388,682 7,409,032 6,819,794 6,486,980
Total 27,972,087 27,972,087 30,914,166 27,157,220 28,296,324 26,948,077 28,254,232 28,777,849

The 2016–2017 variances between Main Estimates, Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending are largely attributable to the timing of key elements of the fiscal cycle. The 2016-2017 Total Authorities ($28.3 million) represent Main Estimates ($27.8 million), plus adjustments to authorities approved by the Treasury Board, such as Operational Budget Carry-Forward.

Total CTA spending for 2016-2017 ($26.9 million) was lower than 2015-2016 ($28.2 million) and previous years. This variance is primarily due to the amounts carried forward in preparation for potential pressures resulting from the renewal of collective agreements and to fund the workload associated with the increase in air travel complaints.

Program spending from 2016-2017 is different from previous years due to the updates to the Treasury Board Secretariat's Guide on Recording and Reporting of Internal Services Expenditures.

Finally, the 2017-2018 Planned Spending demonstrates an increase as it includes the expected cost of the implementation of the Government of Canada's Workplace 2.0 Fit-up Standards.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2014–2015 Actual 2015–2016 Actual 2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2017–2018 Planned 2018–2019 Planned
1.1 Economic Regulation 93 91 98 90 98 98
1.2 Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 71 74 75 72 66 66
Subtotal 164 165 173 162 164 164
1.3 Internal Services 57 64 57 58 62 61
Total 221 229 230 220 226 225

Following the implementation of a new organizational structure at the beginning of 2016-2017, the CTA streamlined the proportion of its human resources expenditures allocated to back-office operations, enabling it to re-allocate resources to address some pressures such as the increase of workload in air travel complaints.

Human resources planning figures are drawn from the CTA's Main Estimates for 2017-2018 and 2018-2019. Given the timing of the Main Estimates submission process, the above planned human resources were not able to take into account a sustained and growing surge in disputes submitted to the CTA, which is forecasted to require that a proportionally greater percentage of total CTA human resources be allocated to Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution over the next few years.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the CTA’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017.

Alignment of spending with the whole-of-government framework

Alignment of 2016-2017 actual spending with the whole-of-government framework (dollars)
Program Spending area Government of Canada activity 2016–2017 Actual spending
Economic Regulation Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace 10,569,836
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace 8,969,209
Internal Services Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace 7,409,032
Total spending by spending area (dollars)
Spending area Total planned spending Total actual spending
Economic affairs 27,792,087 26,948,077
Social affairs N/A N/A
International affairs N/A N/A
Government affairs N/A N/A

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The CTA’s financial statements [unaudited] for the year ended March 31, 2017 are available on the CTA’s website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial information 2016–2017
Planned
results
2016–2017
Actual
2015–2016
Actual
Difference
(2016–2017
actual minus
2016–2017 planned)
Difference
(2016–2017
actual minus
2015–2016 actual)
Total expenses 32,309,191 30,884,378 32,627,177 -1,424,813 -1,742,799
Total revenues - - - - -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 32,309,191 30,884,378 32,627,177 -1,424,813 -1,742,799
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial Information 2016–2017 2015–2016 Difference
(2016–2017 minus
2015–2016)
Total net liabilities 4,664,878 4,754,290 -89,412
Total net financial assets 2,679,830 2,510,610 169,220
CTA net debt 1,985,048 2,243,680 -258,632
Total non-financial assets 654,929 809,028 -154,099
CTA net financial position -1,330,119 -1,434,652 104,533

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C, M.P., Minister of Transport 

Institutional head: Scott Streiner, Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial portfolio: Transport

Enabling instrument[s]: Canada Transportation Act, S.C. 1996, c. 10, as amended

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1904

Other:

The CTA shares responsibility for the following Acts:

  • Access to Information Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. A-1
  • Canada Marine Act, S.C., 1998, c. 10
  • Civil Air Navigation Services Commercialization Act, S.C., 1996, c. 20
  • Coasting Trade Act, S.C., 1992, c. 31
  • Energy Supplies Emergency Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. E-9
  • Financial Administration Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. F-11
  • Official Languages Act, R.S.C, 1985, c. 31 (4th Supp.)
  • Pilotage Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. P-14
  • Privacy Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. P-21
  • Public Service Modernization Act, S.C., 2003, c. 22
  • Railway Relocation and Crossing Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. R-4
  • Railway Safety Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. 32 (4th Supp.)
  • Shipping Conferences Exemption Act, 1987, R.S.C., 1985, c. 17 (3rd Supp.)

The CTA has sole responsibility for the following regulations:

  • Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88-58, as amended
  • Canadian Transportation Agency Designated Provisions Regulations, SOR/99-244
  • Regulations on Operational Terms for Rail Level of Service Arbitration, SOR/2014-192
  • Personnel Training for the Assistance of Persons with Disabilities Regulations, SOR/94-42
  • Railway Costing Regulations, SOR /80-310
  • Railway Interswitching Regulations, SOR/88-41
  • Railway Third Party Liability Insurance Coverage Regulations, SOR/96-337
  • Railway Traffic and Passenger Tariffs Regulations, SOR/96-338
  • Railway Traffic Liability Regulations, SOR/91-448

Rules:

  • Canadian Transportation Agency Rules (Dispute Proceedings and Certain Rules Applicable to All Proceedings), SOR/2014-104
  • Rules of Procedure for Rail Level of Service Arbitration, SOR/2014-94

The CTA shares responsibility for the following regulations:

  • Transportation Information Regulations, SOR/96-334
  • Railway Company Pay Out of Excess Revenue for the Movement of Grain Regulations, SOR/2001-207
  • The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc. Regulations, SOR/98-568
  • The Seaway International Bridge Corporation, Ltd. Regulations, SOR/98-569

These Acts and Regulations are available on the Department of Justice website, and are accessible through the Acts and Regulations  section of the CTA website.

Reporting framework

The CTA's Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2016–2017 are shown below.

1. Strategic Outcome:  Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

1.1 Program: Economic Regulation

1.2 Program: Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on results, financial and human resources related to the CTA Program Inventory is available in the TBS InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the CTA’s website:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

For more information, please visit the CTA’s website or contact the CTA at:

Canadian Transportation Agency
15 Eddy Street
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0N9

Tel: 1-888-222-2592
Fax: 819-997-6727
TTY: 1-800-669-5575

Email: info@otc-cta.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
Evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2016–2017 Departmental Results Report, government-wide priorities refer to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (for example, by Cabinet or a central agency) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
plans (plans)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provide information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities (priorité)
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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