Report on Plans and Priorities 2013-2014

Table of Contents

Other formats:

Supplementary information (tables)

Message from the Chair and Chief Executive Officer

I am pleased to present the Canadian Transportation Agency's Report on Plans and Priorities for 2013-2014.  This report outlines how the Agency will continue to help foster a competitive, efficient and accessible national transportation system that fulfils the needs of Canadians and the Canadian economy.

In the first two years of our 2011-2014 Strategic Plan, the Agency has worked hard to make significant progress in translating the Plan's priorities and action plans from a shared vision into concrete, meaningful results.  In the final year of this Strategic Plan, we will continue to pursue this ambitious agenda to improve Agency services, to be responsive to changing environments, and remain focused on implementing planned actions in support of our three strategic priorities: client service, regulatory regime renewal and people.  For the transportation sector, our priorities and action plans for 2013-2014 will build on the Agency's reputation as a respected and trusted tribunal and economic regulator and contribute to the achievement of a fair and secure marketplace – a key Government of Canada objective.

In support of our client service priority, we will continue to invest in improving communication and relationships with our clients and stakeholders while continuing to build more effective, responsive and efficient dispute resolution processes.  We will also continue to modernize and streamline our case management procedures, develop and actively offer alternative dispute resolution mechanisms, such as arbitration for rail level of service complaints, and introduce new resources to help clients better understand and access our services.

In the area of regulatory regime renewal, we will continue our two-pronged approach of reviewing and streamlining regulations, while simultaneously developing non-regulatory tools to encourage voluntary compliance.  This modernization of the Agency's suite of essential regulations, and their effective administration, will contribute to the Government's red tape reduction commitments.

Under its people strategic priority, the Agency will build on its efforts and successes to maintain a sustainable, expert workforce.  The implementation of the Agency action plan to improve on the results of the Public Service Employee Survey, recognizing employee achievement, and implementing workplace communication training for employees will support this objective.

The Agency also remains committed to the ongoing improvement of its business processes and client services to make them more efficient, effective and responsive.  Our Strategic Plan focuses on key business, operating and human resource priorities, and includes several measures to achieve greater efficiencies, including accelerating the transition to new shared services arrangements.  To continue to guide our work in 2013-2014 and beyond as a service-oriented organization that continuously strives to be better, the Agency will continue to seek feedback from its clients and industry stakeholders, while maintaining and enhancing the use of sound management practices and ensuring that we continue to use our financial resources wisely.

As we conclude the implementation of our 2011-2014 Strategic Plan and begin work on a new 2014-2017 Plan, I am confident that the Agency will maintain its reputation as a respected and trusted tribunal and economic regulator that meets the needs of all Canadians and contributes to Canada's long-term competitiveness and prosperity.

Geoffrey C. Hare
Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Top of Page

Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d'être

The Canadian Transportation Agency is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal and economic regulator.  It makes decisions and determinations on a wide range of matters within the federal transportation system under the authority of Parliament, as set out in the Canada Transportation Act and other legislation.

Our mandate includes:

  • Economic regulation, to provide approvals, issue licences, permits and certificates of fitness, and make decisions on a wide range of matters involving federal air, rail and marine transportation.
  • Dispute resolution, to resolve complaints about federal transportation services, rates, fees and charges.
  • Accessibility, to ensure Canada's national transportation system is accessible to all persons, particularly those with disabilities.

Responsibilities

In meeting its responsibilities, the Agency continuously sets and strives to achieve high performance standards.  Education and consultation are integral to the Agency's effectiveness in carrying out its mandate.  The Agency works closely with transportation service users and providers in Canada, and with other directly affected stakeholders.  It helps travellers, shippers, carriers, municipalities and others to fully understand not only their rights and obligations under the Canada Transportation Act and other statutes and regulations, but also the Agency's roles and responsibilities.

When appropriate, the Agency encourages parties to resolve disputes informally before issues escalate and impact the transportation system.  The Agency consults broadly on issues that are important to the transportation industry.  By remaining open and by listening to all affected parties, the Agency ensures that its decisions are both responsive and responsible.

The Agency exercises its powers through its members, who are appointed by the Governor-in-Council (GIC): the GIC may appoint up to five full-time Members, including the Chair and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and the Vice-Chair.  The Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities can also appoint up to three temporary Members.

The Chair and CEO is accountable for the Agency's three programs.  The Vice-Chair replaces the Chair and CEO during his absence.  All Agency Members, as independent decision-makers, are accountable for making quasi-judicial decisions on matters before the Agency.

Figure 1: Organization Chart

Text version: Figure 1

Agency Organizational Chart

Reporting to the Chair and Chief Executive Officer:

  • Communications Directorate
  • Secretariat Directorate
  • Agency Members
  • Legal Services Branch
  • Corporate Management Branch
  • Dispute Resolution Branch
  • Industry Regulation and Determinations Branch

The Agency's organizational structure is composed of four branches: the Dispute Resolution Branch, the Industry Regulation and Determinations Branch, the Legal Services Branch, the Corporate Management Branch and the Office of the Chair and CEO.  The heads of each branch, as well as the Communications Directorate and the Secretariat Directorate, report directly to the Chair and CEO.

The Agency's headquarters are located in the National Capital Region.  Agency personnel working in field offices in six cities across Canada carry out air and accessibility enforcement activities.  The Agency's role and structure are described on its website.Return to reference1

Parliament funds the Agency through an operating expenditures vote.  The Agency operates within the context of the very large and complex Canadian transportation system.Return to reference2

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

The Canadian Transportation Agency reports on its plans, priorities and expected results to Parliament on the basis of its Program Alignment Architecture (PAA).  The PAA explains how programs and allocation of resources contribute to the Agency's strategic outcome.

Strategic Outcome – Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system
ProgramExpected Results
Economic Regulation Economic and other interests of transportation users, service providers and other affected parties are protected through timely and effective intervention
Service providers (air, rail and marine) comply with regulatory requirements
The Canadian National Railway Company (CN) and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company (CP) are provided with the information required to ensure they do not exceed the maximum grain revenue entitlements for the shipment of Western grain
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution Access to a specialized dispute resolution system that is transparent, fair and timely
Internal Services Support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of the Agency

Organizational Priorities

The Agency's 2011-2014 Strategic Plan sets out how its three organizational priorities – Client Service, Regulatory Regime Renewal, and People – will contribute to the strategic outcome.

PriorityTypeNote 3Strategic Outcome and Programs
Client Service Previously committed to Strategic Outcome

Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

Programs

Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Internal Services

Description

This priority will result in the Agency's dispute resolution services being of high quality, and its clients being well informed and served in a responsive and timely manner.

Why is client service a priority?

Modernizing and further streamlining the Agency's dispute resolution services responds to:

  • increased demand for services as a result of existing and emerging issues in the transportation industry nationally and internationally, as well as in the policy environment; and
  • client expectations of efficiency, fairness and transparency.

How the Agency will meet this priority

Now entering the final year of its 2011-2014 Strategic Plan, the Agency aims to:

  • build on our efforts to improve its case management practices and procedures;
  • introduce new and expanded client-oriented resources to facilitate better access to and understanding of dispute resolution services;
  • invest in expanding and actively promoting the use of alternative dispute resolution;
  • build constructive and positive relations with and proactively engage clients in an ongoing dialogue to better understand and proactively respond to their needs; and
  • measure and monitor client satisfaction and program performance against Agency targets to identify opportunities for further improvement.

 

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome and Programs
Regulatory Regime Renewal Previously committed to Strategic Outcome

Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

Programs

Economic Regulation

Internal Services

Description

By meeting this priority, the Agency's regulatory and non-regulatory approaches and their administration will be up-to-date, well understood and delivered effectively and efficiently.

Why is regulatory regime renewal a priority?

Modernizing regulatory and non-regulatory approaches responds to:

  • stakeholder demand for greater focus, transparency and timeliness; and
  • the Government of Canada's objective for a streamlined regulatory regime and reduction of red tape.

How the Agency will meet this priority

Now entering the final year of its 2011-2014 Strategic Plan, the Agency aims to:

  • undertake additional reviews and updates of its regulations;
  • develop new and update existing non-regulatory approaches to achieving desired outcomes;
  • achieve objectives resulting from the streamlining of the Agency's regulatory administrative processes;
  • enhance regulatory compliance through voluntary and non-voluntary means; and
  • measure and monitor industry stakeholder satisfaction and program performance and engage stakeholders to identify opportunities for continuous improvement.

 

PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome and Programs
People Ongoing Strategic Outcome

Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

Programs

Economic Regulation

Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Internal Services

Description

This priority focuses on recruitment, retention and development of a diverse workforce and sustaining a work environment where Agency employees are engaged, knowledgeable, respected and provide excellent client service.

Why are people a priority?

A sustainable, expert workforce and supportive workplace will respond to:

  • the knowledge and skills required of its employees to provide support to the adjudicative decision-making process and to maintain an effective and responsive regulatory framework;
  • the demographic challenge posed by the retirement and turnover of staff, leading to a loss of corporate expertise; and
  • the high level of expertise required to deliver quality service and to discharge new mandate responsibilities.

How the Agency will meet this priority

Now entering the final year of its 2011-2014 Strategic Plan, the Agency aims to:

  • complete the implementation of the action plan to respond to the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey (PSES) results;
  • support the 2014 PSES;
  • provide workplace communications training for employees; and
  • implement new, effective work tools and training initiatives.

Risk Analysis

The Agency updates its Corporate Risk Profile annually and monitors risks continually.  Risk analyses help the Agency to set priorities and to develop operational plans and mitigation strategies.

In 2013-2014, the Agency faces two new challenges that will put pressure on its budget resources: implementing an expanded mandate for rail service agreement disputes and implementation of regulations for air services price advertising.  Through effective budget management and achievement of operational efficiencies, the Agency will absorb these new responsibilities within its budget allocation.

In addition, the Agency will focus on managing the following corporate risks:

RiskLink to Strategic Priorities
Client ServiceRegulatory Regime RenewalPeople
Resource reductions and constraints that would challenge the Agency's ability to deliver its mandate or respond to changes in government policy X X X
Loss of reputation as a respected and trusted tribunal and economic regulator X X  
Loss of business critical knowledge, information and expertise X X X
The Agency does not have the capacity to respond to expanded organizational requirements X X X
The Agency fails to capitalize on technology X X X
The Agency is unable to manage the shift toward a shared services model X X X

As a quasi-judicial administrative tribunal, the Agency has earned a reputation of impartiality, integrity and expertise.  This reputation is founded on its independence from outside influence, its procedural fairness and timeliness, its expertise in transportation and human rights matters and the deference granted the Agency's past decisions by the Federal Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Canada.

The Agency must retain a high level of expertise to deliver quality service and to discharge new responsibilities. The Agency is at risk of losing significant corporate knowledge over the next few years, as many long-term employees retire.  A continuing priority will be to transfer knowledge between employees and to develop and retain highly competent staff.

At the corporate level, the Agency faces many significant challenges, along with risks related to reengineering business processes to integrate information systems and transitioning to new shared services arrangements.  During this time of change, the Agency must ensure business continuity and maintain stable operations while capitalizing on the benefits of new technologies and more effective and efficient processes.

To address its risks, the Agency will pursue the following actions and mitigation strategies:

  • Participating in legislative and regulation change processes;
  • Actively monitoring transport industry events and communications to understand evolving transportation trends and relevant policy developments;
  • Analyzing client satisfaction survey results to identify changes in expectations, understand service delivery concerns, and adjust to client needs;
  • Monitoring, gathering and sharing information about changes to government policy or central agency directives (e.g., performance and financial reporting, shared services, human resources);
  • Participating in the shared services review led by Treasury Board Secretariat and Public Works and Government Services Canada;
  • Effectively managing human and financial resources by implementing the Agency's HR Plan for recruitment and retention, and by using an active vacancy management approach;
  • Reallocating resources when there are increases in demand on service, including for new mandates; and
  • Addressing and implementing internal audit recommendations made by the Office of the Comptroller General.

Planning Summary

Financial Resources (Planned Spending — $ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2013-2014Planned Spending 2013-2014Planned Spending 2014-2015Planned Spending 2015-2016
27,661 29,884 28,179 28,178

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTE)
2013-20142014-20152015-2016
246 243 239

Planned spending for 2013-2014 includes Main Estimates planned spending, an estimate of the funding carry-forward from 2012-2013 and anticipated funding through transfers from Treasury Board Secretariat Vote 30 related to the payout of severance pay and other salary-related items refundable by Treasury Board Secretariat, given that these amounts can be estimated with some certainty.

For 2014-2015 and 2015-2016, total planned spending corresponds to Main Estimates planned spending and anticipated funding through transfers from Treasury Board Secretariat Vote 30 related to the payout of severance pay and other salary-related items refundable by Treasury Board Secretariat, as the funding carry-forward cannot be objectively forecast with any certainty.

Planning Summary Table ($ thousands)
Strategic OutcomeProgramActual Spending 2010-2011Actual Spending 2011-2012Forecast Spending 2012-2013Planned SpendingAlignment to Government of Canada Outcome
2013-20142014-20152015-2016
Transparent fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system Economic Regulation 12,521 12,918 12,208 12,881 12,192 12,174 A fair and secure marketplace 
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 8,080 8,190 8,341 9,118 8,652 8,787
Sub-Total 20,601 21,108 20,549 21,999 20,844 20,961

 

Planning Summary Table for Internal Services ($ thousands)
ProgramActual Spending 2010-2011Actual Spending 2011-2012Forecast Spending 2012-2013Planned Spending
2013-20142014-20152015-2016
Sub-Total 8,189 8,199 7,797 7,885 7,335 7,217
Internal Services 8,189 8,199 7,797 7,885 7,335 7,217

 

Planning Summary Total ($ thousands)
Strategic Outcome Programs, and Internal ServicesActual Spending 2010-2011Actual Spending 2011-2012Forecast Spending 2012-2013Planned Spending
2013-20142014-20152015-2016
Total 28,790 29,308 28,345 29,884 28,179 28,178

Expenditure Profile

Figure 2 - Text Version: Departmental Spending Trend
Departmental Spending Trend
2009-20102010-20112011-20122012-20132013-20142014-20152015-2016
28,041 28,790 29,308 28,345 29,884 28,179 28,178

From 2009-2010 to 2011-2012, spending increased $1.3 million mainly due to the Treasury Board Secretariat reimbursement for the payout of severance pay and termination benefits related to the latest collective agreements and other salary-related items.

Forecast spending is $1.0 million lower for 2012-2013 than for actual spending in 2011-2012, as the Agency anticipates there will be fewer expenses for the payout of severance pay and termination benefits related to collective agreements.

Planned spending in 2013-2014 has increased compared to 2012-2013 mainly as a result of the planned implementation of new mandates and costs associated with new shared services arrangements in 2013-2014 using existing funding.

Finally, for fiscal years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016, total planned spending is lower than previous years, as the Agency anticipates to already have paid out the majority of the severance pay and termination benefits related to the latest collective agreements.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Agency's organizational appropriations, please see the 2013–2014 Main Estimates publication.

Top of Page

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

Program 1: Economic Regulation

Program Description

The Agency helps to protect the interests of users, service providers and others affected by the federal transportation system through economic regulation of air, rail and marine transportation.  It regulates air transportation and helps to protect the interest of the travelling public, shippers and Canadian air carriers by enforcing the Canada Transportation Act and related regulations, administering a licensing system, helping to negotiate bilateral agreements, and ensuring that terms and conditions of carriage are consistent with Canadian legislation.  It develops regulations, codes of practice, standards, and educational and outreach programs to ensure that undue obstacles to the mobility of persons with disabilities are removed from the federal transportation system.  It regulates the national rail system by issuing certificates of fitness allowing carriers to operate, approving rail line construction and overseeing the discontinuance of service, and it is involved in economic duties, such as the determination of interswitching rates and revenue caps for the movement of Western grain.  It acts mainly as an economic regulator in marine transportation by administering legislation governing shipping conferences and allowing the use of foreign ships for coasting trade only when Canadian vessels are not available.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2013-2014Planned Spending 2013-2014Planned Spending 2014-2015Planned Spending 2015-2016
11,941 12,881 12,192 12,174

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013-20142014-20152015-2016
106 104 102

 

Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Economic and other interests of transportation users, service providers and other affected parties are protected through timely and effective intervention Percentage of satisfaction with economic regulation services 70%
Service providers (air, rail and marine) comply with regulatory requirements Percentage of air carriers found to be non-compliant with essential market entry requirements Less than 1%
Level of compliance with targeted regulatory and voluntary accessibility requirements Regulatory requirements: 85%

Voluntary requirements: 65%

CN and CP are provided with the information required to ensure they do not exceed the maximum grain revenue entitlements for the shipment of Western grain Number of times that either CN or CP have not exceeded their Western grain revenue cap entitlement by more than 1% over the last 3 years 5/6

Planning Highlights

In 2013-2014, the Agency will focus on:

  • working with international and domestic air carriers to ensure that their contracts of carriage (i.e. their tariff) align with recent landmark Agency decisions related to the overbooking and cancellations practices of certain air carriers examined in light of the Montreal Convention;
  • implementing phase 2 of the modernization of the Air Transportation Regulations dealing with air charters in order to better align the regulations with the current policy framework and the evolution of the air industry;
  • developing regulations to provide for administrative monetary penalties for non-performance of obligations in arbitrator decisions on rail service agreement disputes (in conjunction with the Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution program);
  • updating regulations pertaining to persons with disabilities, including the Personnel Training Regulations and Part VII of the Air Transportation Regulation regarding the conditions of carriage of persons with disabilities;
  • working with industry to ensure compliance with the new air services price advertising regulation and other regulations; and
  • working with industry to ensure compliance with voluntary codes on accessible transportation.

Program 2: Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Program Description

The Agency helps to protect the interests of users, service providers and others affected by the national transportation system through access to a specialized dispute resolution system of formal and informal processes for rail, air and marine transportation matters within the national transportation system.  Where possible, the Agency encourages the resolution of disputes through informal processes such as facilitation, mediation, and arbitration.  As a quasi-judicial tribunal, the Agency also has the authority to issue decisions and orders on matters within its jurisdiction of federally-regulated modes of transportation through formal adjudication.  It resolves disputes between the travelling public, shippers and Canadian air carriers over terms and conditions of air carriage and new or revised air navigational charges imposed by NAV Canada; disputes between travellers and transportation providers over undue obstacles to the mobility of persons with disabilities within the federally regulated transportation system; disputes between railway companies, shippers, municipalities, road authorities, and landowners over rail infrastructure matters and level of service; and disputes between vessel operators and port and pilotage authorities over charges for pilotage or fees fixed by port authorities.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2013-2014Planned Spending 2013-2014Planned Spending 2014-2015Planned Spending 2015-2016
8,465 9,118 8,652 8,787

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013-20142014-20152015-2016
70 72 71

 

Program Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Access to a specialized dispute resolution system that is transparent, fair and timely Percentage of satisfaction with Agency dispute resolution services 70%

Planning Highlights

In 2013-2014, the Agency will focus on:

  • following amendments to the Canada Transportation Act, implementing new legislative provisions related to arbitration of rail service agreement disputes to provide efficient and effective resolution of disputes related to the establishment of rail service agreements;
  • in relation to its new mandate, developing a compliance approach for arbitrator decisions on rail service agreement disputes, investigate cases of non-compliance and assess administrative monetary penalties (in conjunction with the Economic Regulation program);
  • promoting and expanding the use of alternative dispute resolution as a faster and more cost-effective dispute resolution mechanism; and
  • implementing streamlined and modernized rules of procedure contained in revised Agency General Rules.

Program 3: Internal Services

Program Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization.  These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services.  Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2013-2014Planned Spending 2013-2014Planned Spending 2014-2015Planned Spending 2015-2016
7,255 7,885 7,335 7,217

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013-20142014-20152015-2016
70 67 66

Planning Highlights

As part of its ongoing efforts to improve its internal services management, the Agency will continue to strengthen its management systems and governance in order to operate effectively and efficiently and maintain long-term, responsible fiscal management.  This will involve risk-based and result-focused planning and allocation of resources, coordinated operational direction and clear performance management.  Long-term planning and targeted expenditure reviews will support efforts to direct Agency resources in support of the highest priorities.

In 2013-2014, the Agency will focus on:

  • developing and launching its 2014-2017 Strategic Plan;
  • implementing the IM/IT strategy and Web service enhancements and tools;
  • implementing shared systems and services (i.e., financial and case management);
  • administering the Agency's comprehensive Client Satisfaction Survey Program and integrating feedback into service improvements;
  • fostering employee engagement by promoting employee recognition and developing workplace communications training for employees; and
  • strengthening the efficiency and effectiveness of the Agency's programs and service delivery through implementation of the Agency's multi-year Process and Service Modernization Initiative (PSMI), involving evaluation and reengineering of business processes.

Top of Page

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Highlights

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position
For the Year (ended March 31)
($ thousands)
  $ ChangeForecast
2013-2014
Estimated Results
2012-2013
Departmental net
financial position
534 (1,291) (1,825)
Total expenses 940 33,147 32,207
Total revenues - - -
Net cost of
operations before
government funding
and transfers
940 33,147 32,207

 

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Financial Position
For the Year (ended March 31)
($ thousands)
  $ ChangeForecast
2013-2014
Estimated Results
2012-2013
Departmental net
financial position
534 (1,291) (1,825)
Total net liabilities (1,071) 3,465 4,536
Total net financial
assets
(81) 1,412 1,493
Departmental net
debt
(990) 2,053 3,043
Total non-financial
assets
(456) 762 1,218

Future-Oriented Financial Statements

The Future-Oriented Financial Statements for the Canadian Transportation Agency can be found on the Agency's website.Return to reference4

List of Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2013-2014 Reports on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Canadian Transportation Agency's website.Return to reference5

  • Greening Government Operations
  • Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue
  • Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and EvaluationsReturn to reference6 publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Top of Page

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

Area of ResponsibilityContact NameTitleTelephone NumberE-mail Address
Legal Services Liz Barker General Counsel 819-997-9325 liz.barker@otc-cta.gc.ca
Dispute Resolution Nina Frid Director General 819-953-5074 nina.frid@otc-cta.gc.ca
Industry Regulation and Determinations Ghislain Blanchard Director General 819-953-4657 ghislain.blanchard@otc-cta.gc.ca
Corporate Management Linda Harrison Director General 819-997-6764 linda.harrison@otc-cta.gc.ca
Finance, Administration and Planning Christine Guérette Director 819-953-2829 christine.guerette@otc-cta.gc.ca
Communications Jacqueline Bannister Director 819-953-7666 jacqueline.bannister@otc-cta.gc.ca
Secretariat Cathy Murphy Secretary

819-997-0099

cathy.murphy@otc-cta.gc.ca

Postal address:
Canadian Transportation Agency
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0N9

Website:
http://www.otc-cta.gc.ca/

Legislation and Regulations

The Agency is responsible for the following Act:

  • Canada Transportation Act (S.C., 1996, c. 10, as amended)

The Agency shares responsibility for the following Acts:

  • Access to Information Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. A-1)
  • Canada Marine Act (S.C., 1998, c. 10)
  • Civil Air Navigation Services Commercialization Act (S.C., 1996, c. 20)
  • Coasting Trade Act (S.C., 1992, c. 31)
  • Energy Supplies Emergency Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. E-9)
  • Financial Administration Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. F-11)
  • Official Languages Act (R.S.C, 1985, c. 31 (4th Supp.))
  • Pilotage Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. P-14)
  • Privacy Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. P-21)
  • Public Service Modernization Act (S.C., 2003, c. 22)
  • Railway Relocation and Crossing Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. R-4)
  • Railway Safety Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. 32 (4th Supp.))
  • Shipping Conferences Exemption Act, 1987 (R.S.C., 1985, c. 17 (3rd Supp.))

The Agency has sole responsibility for the following regulations:

  • Air Transportation Regulations
  • Canadian Transportation Agency Designated Provisions Regulations
  • Canadian Transportation Agency General Rules
  • Personnel Training for the Assistance of Persons with Disabilities Regulations
  • Railway Costing Regulations
  • Railway Interswitching Regulations
  • Railway Third Party Liability Insurance Coverage Regulations
  • Railway Traffic and Passenger Tariffs Regulations
  • Railway Traffic Liability Regulations

The Agency shares responsibility for the following regulations:

  • Carriers and Transportation and Grain Handling Undertakings Information

Regulations

  • Railway Company Pay Out of Excess Revenue for the Movement of Grain Regulations
  • The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc. Regulations
  • The Seaway International Bridge Corporation, Ltd. Regulations

These Acts and Regulations are available on the Department of JusticeReturn to reference7 website, and are accessible through the Legislation and RegulationsReturn to reference8 section of the Agency's website.

Date modified: