Report on Plans and Priorities 2014-2015

Table of Contents

Other formats:

2014-15 Estimates

Purpose

Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are individual expenditure plans for each department and agency. These reports provide increased levels of detail over a three-year period on an organization's main priorities by strategic outcome, program and planned/expected results, including links to related resource requirements presented in the Main Estimates. In conjunction with the Main Estimates, Reports on Plans and Priorities serve to inform members of Parliament on planned expenditures of departments and agencies, and support Parliament's consideration of supply bills. The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board.

Estimates Documents

The Estimates are comprised of three parts:

Part I – Government Expenditure Plan – provides an overview of the Government's requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II – Main Estimates – supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

In accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Parts I and II must be tabled on or before March 1.

Part III – Departmental Expenditure Plans – consists of two components:

  • Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
  • Departmental Performance Report (DPR)

DPRs are individual department and agency accounts of results achieved against planned performance expectations as set out in respective RPPs.
The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the Treasury Board.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

For more information on the Estimates, please consult the Treasury Board Secretariat website.

Links to the Estimates

As shown above, RPPs make up part of the Part III of the Estimates documents. Whereas Part II emphasizes the financial aspect of the Estimates, Part III focuses on financial and non-financial performance information, both from a planning and priorities standpoint (RPP), and an achievements and results perspective (DPR).

The Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) establishes a structure for display of financial information in the Estimates and reporting to Parliament via RPPs and DPRs. When displaying planned spending, RPPs rely on the Estimates as a basic source of financial information.

Main Estimates expenditure figures are based on the Annual Reference Level Update which is prepared in the fall. In comparison, planned spending found in RPPs includes the Estimates as well as any other amounts that have been approved through a Treasury Board submission up to February 1st (See Definitions section). This readjusting of the financial figures allows for a more up-to-date portrait of planned spending by program.

Changes to the presentation of the Report on Plans and Priorities

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the RPP partially to respond to a number of requests – from the House of Commons Standing Committees on Public Accounts (PACReport 15), in 2010; and on Government and Operations Estimates (OGGO – Report 7), in 2012 – to provide more detailed financial and non-financial performance information about programs within RPPs and DPRs, thus improving the ease of their study to support appropriations approval.

  • In Section II, financial, human resources and performance information is now presented at the Program and Sub-program levels for more granularity.
  • The report's general format and terminology have been reviewed for clarity and consistency purposes.
  • Other efforts aimed at making the report more intuitive and focused on Estimates information were made to strengthen alignment with the Main Estimates.

How to read this document

RPPs are divided into four sections:

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

This Organizational Expenditure Overview allows the reader to get a general glance at the organization. It provides a description of the organization's purpose, as well as basic financial and human resources information. This section opens with the new Organizational Profile, which displays general information about the department, including the names of the minister and the deputy head, the ministerial portfolio, the year the department was established, and the main legislative authorities. This subsection is followed by a new subsection entitled Organizational Context, which includes the Raison d'être, the Responsibilities, the Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture, the Organizational Priorities and the Risk Analysis. This section ends with the Planned Expenditures, the Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes, the Estimates by Votes and the Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. It should be noted that this section does not display any non-financial performance information related to programs (please see Section II).

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome(s)

This Section provides detailed financial and non-financial performance information for strategic outcomes, Programs and sub-programs. This section allows the reader to learn more about programs by reading their respective description and narrative entitled "Planning Highlights". This narrative speaks to key services or initiatives which support the plans and priorities presented in Section I; it also describes how performance information supports the department's strategic outcome or parent program.

Section III: Supplementary Information

This section provides supporting information related to departmental plans and priorities. In  this section, the reader will find future-oriented statement of operations and a link to supplementary information tables regarding transfer payments, as well as information related to the greening government operations, internal audits and evaluations, horizontal initiatives, user fees, major crown and transformational projects, and up-front multi-year funding, where applicable to individual organizations. The reader will also find a link to the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report, produced annually by the Minister of Finance, which provides estimates and projections of the revenue impacts of federal tax measures designed to support the economic and social priorities of the Government of Canada.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

In this last section, the reader will have access to organizational contact information.

Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary vs. Non-budgetary  Expenditures
Budgetary expenditures – operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to crown corporations.
Non-budgetary expenditures – net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Expected Result
An outcome that a program is designed to achieve.
Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. FTEs are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work.  Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada Outcomes
A set of high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole.
Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS)
A common approach and structure to the collection, management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information.
An MRRS provides detailed information on all departmental programs (e.g.: program costs, program expected results and their associated targets, how they align to the government's priorities and intended outcomes, etc.) and establishes the same structure for both internal decision making and external accountability.
Planned Spending
For the purpose of the RPP, planned spending refers to those amounts for which a Treasury Board (TB) submission approval has been received by no later than February 1, 2014. This cut-off date differs from the Main Estimates process. Therefore, planned spending may include  amounts incremental to planned expenditure levels presented in the 2014-2015 Main Estimates.
Program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of a department's programs, where programs are arranged in a hierarchical manner to depict the logical relationship between each program and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Spending Areas
Government of Canada categories of expenditures. There are four spending areas (social affairs, economic affairs, international affairs and government affairs) each comprised of three to five Government of Canada outcomes.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the department's mandate, vision, and core functions.
Sunset Program
A time-limited program that does not have on-going funding or policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made as to whether to continue the program. (In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration).
Whole-of-Government Framework
A map of the financial and non-financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations that aligns their Programs to a set of high level outcome areas defined for the government as a whole.

Message from the Chair and Chief Executive Officer

It is my pleasure to present the Canadian Transportation Agency's 2014-2015 Report on Plans and Priorities. This document outlines how the Agency will continue to play its part in making transportation more efficient and accessible for all.

Having successfully wrapped up our 2011-2014 Strategic Plan, we are launching a new three-year plan that focuses on achieving excellence in all that we do. I'm proud to say that this new plan incorporates ideas from all levels of staff and is inspired by Blueprint 2020, the Government of Canada's plan for the renewal of the public service.

The 2014-2017 Strategic Plan has three areas of focus:

  • Service Excellence;
  • Regulatory Effectiveness; and
  • High-Performing Organization.

This coming year will see the pilot implementation phase of a new Shared Case Management System. This centrally-procured system will allow us to offer clients increased electronic access to services, along with streamlined processing of determinations and decisions. To further support the Government's focus on efficient, streamlined service delivery, the Agency will implement several shared services and systems in finance, human resources and information technology. As a high-performing organization, we will continue to provide our employees with the tools and support they need to perform at their highest level.

Our new plan takes into account the feedback offered by our clients and stakeholders. They want easier, more straightforward access to the information they need. Our new website and Agency rules of procedure for adjudicating disputes will help to address this need. We will also maintain our focus on engaging consumers and industry in two-way dialogue and acting promptly where their feedback suggests changes are needed.

In its role as a regulatory body, the Agency will ensure the effective administration of legislation and that regulatory requirements are relevant and streamlined. Furthermore, we aim to promote industry compliance with these requirements through targeted outreach and education. At the same time, we will continue to hold non-compliant companies accountable.

The 2014-2015 objectives set out in this report will enable the Agency to uphold its reputation as a trusted and respected tribunal that supports a competitive, efficient and accessible transportation system.

Geoffrey C. Hare

Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Lisa Raitt, P.C., M.P., Minister of Transport

Deputy head: Geoffrey C. Hare, Chair and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Transportation Agency

Ministerial portfolio: Transport

Year established: 1904

Main legislative authorities: Canada Transportation Act, S.C. 1996, c. 10, as amendedNote 1

Other:

The Agency shares responsibility for the following Acts:

  • Access to Information Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. A-1
  • Canada Marine Act, S.C., 1998, c. 10
  • Civil Air Navigation Services Commercialization Act, S.C., 1996, c. 20
  • Coasting Trade Act, S.C., 1992, c. 31
  • Energy Supplies Emergency Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. E-9
  • Financial Administration Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. F-11
  • Official Languages Act, R.S.C, 1985, c. 31 (4th Supp.)
  • Pilotage Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. P-14
  • Privacy Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. P-21
  • Public Service Modernization Act, S.C., 2003, c. 22
  • Railway Relocation and Crossing Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. R-4
  • Railway Safety Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. 32 (4th Supp.)
  • Shipping Conferences Exemption Act, 1987, R.S.C., 1985, c. 17 (3rd Supp.)

The Agency has sole responsibility for the following regulations:

  • Air Transportation Regulations
  • Canadian Transportation Agency Designated Provisions Regulations
  • Canadian Transportation Agency General Rules
  • Personnel Training for the Assistance of Persons with Disabilities Regulations
  • Railway Costing Regulations
  • Railway Third Party Liability Insurance Coverage Regulations
  • Railway Traffic and Passenger Tariffs Regulations
  • Railway Traffic Liability Regulations

The Agency shares responsibility for the following regulations:

  • Carriers and Transportation and Grain Handling Undertakings Information Regulations
  • Railway Company Pay Out of Excess Revenue for the Movement of Grain Regulations
  • The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc. Regulations
  • The Seaway International Bridge Corporation, Ltd. Regulations

These Acts and Regulations are available on the Department of Justice website,Note 2 and are accessible through the Legislation and Regulations Note 3section of the Agency's website.

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Canadian Transportation Agency is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal and economic regulator.  It makes decisions and determinations on a wide range of matters within the federal transportation system under the authority of Parliament, as set out in the Canada Transportation Act and other legislation.

Our mandate includes:

  • Economic regulation, to provide approvals, issue licences, permits and certificates of fitness, and make decisions on a wide range of matters involving federal air, rail and marine transportation.
  • Dispute resolution, to resolve complaints about federal transportation services, rates, fees and charges.
  • Accessibility, to ensure Canada's national transportation system is accessible to all persons, particularly those with disabilities.

Responsibilities 

The Agency sets and strives to achieve high performance standards as it carries out its dispute resolution and regulatory activities.  The Agency encourages parties to resolve disputes informally before issues escalate and impact the transportation system.  If informal methods do not resolve the situation, the Agency has the authority to issue decisions on dispute-related matters.  To ensure its regulatory and accessibility-related responsibilities are administered efficiently, the Agency consults broadly on issues that are important to the transportation industry and its users.  By remaining open and by listening to all affected parties, the Agency ensures that its decisions are both timely and responsive, and its administration of regulation is effective and streamlined.

The Agency exercises its powers through its Members.  Up to five full-time Members, including the Chair and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and the Vice-Chair, may be appointed by the Governor-in-Council.  The Minister of Transport can also appoint up to three temporary Members.

The Chair and CEO is accountable for the Agency's three programs.  The Vice-Chair replaces the Chair and CEO during his absence.  All Agency Members are independent and accountable for making quasi-judicial decisions on matters before the Agency.

Figure 1

Text Version: Organization Chart

Agency Organizational Chart

Reporting to the Chair and Chief Executive Officer:

  • Communications Directorate
  • Secretariat Directorate
  • Agency Members
  • Legal Services Branch
  • Corporate Management Branch
  • Dispute Resolution Branch
  • Industry Regulation and Determinations Branch Return to reference?

The Agency is divided into four branches: Dispute Resolution, Industry Regulation and Determinations, Legal Services, and Corporate Management, as well as the Office of the Chair and CEO.  Each branch head, as well as the head of the Communications Directorate and the Agency Secretary, report directly to the Chair and CEO.

The Agency's headquarters are located in the National Capital Region.  Field offices located in six cities across Canada carry out air and accessibility enforcement activities.  Further details about the Agency's role and structure can be found on its website.Note 4

Parliament funds the Agency through an operating expenditures vote.  The Agency operates within the context of the very large and complex Canadian transportation system.Note 5

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

Strategic Outcome: Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system.

  1. Program: Economic Regulation 
  2. Program: Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution
Internal Services
Strategic Outcome – Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system
ProgramExpected Results
Economic Regulation Service providers (air, rail and marine) comply with regulatory requirements
CN and CP are provided with the information required to ensure they do not exceed the maximum grain revenue entitlements for the shipment of Western Grain
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution Specialized transportation dispute resolution that is transparent, fair and timely
Internal Services Support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of the Agency

 

Organizational Priorities
PriorityTypeNote 6Strategic Outcome and Programs

Service Excellence

The Agency is recognized for its service innovation and excellence.

New

Strategic Outcome
Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

Programs

  • Economic Regulation
  • Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Internal Services

 

Description

Why is this a priority?

The Agency prides itself on delivering quality service and being responsive to the needs of transportation consumers and industry.  To maintain its reputation for excellence, the Agency will focus on enhancing service delivery to increase efficiency, effectiveness and timeliness.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

In 2014-2015, the Agency will focus on:

  • re-engineering case management and interaction with clients by preparing for the introduction of a new Shared Case Management System;
  • implementing a comprehensive, coordinated stakeholder outreach strategy, developing an integrated approach to collecting stakeholder feedback, and responding to this feedback publicly on a regular basis;
  • enhancing consumer and industry engagement and understanding of Agency services;
  • implementing a "single-window" approach for all types of disputes and all dispute resolution clients; and
  • implementing the new Agency rules of procedure for adjudicating disputes.
PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome and Programs

Regulatory Effectiveness

The regulatory regime meets the needs of Canadians and enhances the competitiveness and accessibility of the national transportation system.

New

Strategic Outcome
Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

Programs

  • Economic Regulation
  • Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Internal Services

 

Description

Why is this a priority?

By making regulatory effectiveness a priority, the Agency will ensure that its regulatory and non-regulatory approaches and their administration are easy to understand, up-to-date, and are delivered effectively and efficiently.  This priority corresponds to the needs of Agency stakeholders and the Government's focus on effective regulation.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

In 2014-2015, the Agency will focus on:

  • renewing regulations and codes of practice to increase efficiency and reduce regulatory burden;
  • actively contributing to legislative and policy reviews affecting the Agency's mandate;
  • maximizing industry compliance with legislative and regulatory requirements, as well as Agency decisions; and
  • promoting compliance through targeted education and outreach activities and enforcement where necessary.
PriorityTypeStrategic Outcome and Programs

High-Performing Organization

The Agency has engaged, skilled and knowledgeable employees who are supported by effective and efficient systems and services.

New

Strategic Outcome
Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

Programs

  • Economic Regulation
  • Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Internal Services

 

Description

Why is this a priority?

The Agency strives to be a high-performing organization so it can discharge its dispute resolution and regulatory services effectively and efficiently.  To achieve this goal, the Agency will focus on enabling employees to perform at their highest level, with the support of modern and efficient systems and services.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

In 2014-2015, the Agency will focus on:

  • transforming internal services and processes to enhance effectiveness and align with federal government shared services models and common business models;
  • engaging employees and creating opportunities for feedback and dialogue to ensure the maintenance of a supportive workplace;
  • supporting employee excellence through performance management, continuous learning and professional development; and
  • preserving and enhancing business-critical expertise and information through a targeted knowledge and information management strategy.

Risk Analysis

While developing its 2014-2017 Strategic Plan, the Agency performed an extensive analysis of its risk factors as well as its organizational strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This process confirmed that, although the core mandate remains unchanged, three developments may challenge the Agency in delivering on its commitments.

Key Risks

RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program Alignment Architecture

1. Regulatory development and renewal capacity

Insufficient capacity to simultaneously renew existing regulations and develop new regulations resulting from Government of Canada priorities (e.g., renewal of the Air Transportation Regulations and Railway Third Party Liability Insurance Coverage Regulations)

  • Actively engage industry, consumers and government stakeholders to keep abreast of trends, foresee and respond to changes and new developments
  • Create additional capacity by systematically reviewing and streamlining processes, procedures, regulatory administrative requirements, delegated authorities and reallocating resources
  • Economic Regulation
  • Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Internal Services

2. Corporate services realignment

Significant financial and human resources required to respond to common federal government initiatives (e.g., shared services, process standardization, etc.), while maintaining sufficient capacity to support the Agency's mandate

  • Keep abreast of new developments at central agencies and adjust internal governance and planning accordingly
  • Develop a shared services transition strategy that plans for and responds to centrally-driven shared services and process standardization initiatives
  • Economic Regulation
  • Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Internal Services

3. Case management modernization

Any delays in implementation of the new shared case management system may impact Agency initiatives to achieve efficiencies and enhance client service delivery

  • Remain engaged with central agency committees and working groups responsible for procurement and technical aspects rating, selection, configuration, testing, etc.
  • Develop a comprehensive implementation plan for the case management system, including business process mapping, identifying user needs, and upgrading systems and ensure rigorous project oversight, management and execution
  • Economic Regulation
  • Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Internal Services

 

1. Regulatory development and renewal capacity

Following the derailment in Lac Mégantic, the Agency launched a public review of the Third Party Liability Insurance Coverage Regulations.  Depending on the outcome of this review, the Agency may have to reallocate resources to address the corresponding increased workload.

As a result of the passage of the Fair Rail Freight Service Act, the Agency may experience increased demand for arbitration services.  The Agency will reallocate resources in response to this increase and engage in proactive outreach to help shippers better understand the new level of service agreement arbitration process.

In the air transportation sector, the Agency is anticipating a higher workload related to the administration of wet-lease applications as a result of the wet leasing policy guidance recently issued by the government.

To create additional capacity, the Agency will continue with a series of internal streamlining initiatives to reduce resources required to issue orders, decisions, permits and licences, thereby freeing up resources for priority areas.  For example, automated processing mechanisms can improve the speed and efficiency of business transactions with industry.  More resources can also be saved through updating technology to support more effective case processing.  Wherever possible, the Agency will also re-evaluate and streamline requirements in an effort to reduce turnaround times and overall cost.

2. Corporate services realignment

To return to balanced budgets and to increase accountability, the Government is transforming its internal corporate services by requiring the use of shared service delivery models as well as common processes, policies and systems.  These centrally-driven measures could result in a significant transition which could, if not properly managed by the Agency, prevent the Agency from effectively delivering on its core responsibilities and interrupt business continuity.

To mitigate these risks, the Agency regularly engages with central agencies about changes to government policy.  Many aspects of corporate services have been realigned with the Agency's core governance structure to both inform decision-making and adapt to its ever-changing environment.  Furthermore, a new, multi-year Agency shared services transition strategy will ensure core business continuity through a consistent and comprehensive approach towards the services affected, costs, and human resource implications.

3. Case management modernization

The Agency is in the initial stages of modernizing its internal case management system.  This is a major project and investment for the Agency over the next three years and will, in turn, increase Agency efficiency and enhance the client experience.  As such, it is among the Agency's top priorities.

The Agency is part of a cluster of departments and agencies committed to using a new, shared case management system recently procured by central agencies.  The Agency has already invested heavily in this shared initiative by providing financial and human resources, upgrading related systems and software, and mapping business processes.  Complex central procurement procedures have resulted in delays in implementing the shared case management system, impeding the Agency's achievement of its business objectives.  Further delays would put the Agency at risk of being unable to deliver on several core business and service delivery objectives.

To support a timely implementation, the Agency has actively sponsored the project, advised on the central steering committee, and provided resources to support working groups tasked with technical components of the selection and testing processes.  A case management committee has been integrated into the Agency's governance structure to oversee project progress, ensure timely implementation and account for further risks as they are identified.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending—dollars)

2014-2015
Main Estimates
2014-2015
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
27,650,622 29,000,653 28,173,251 28,173,253

 

Human Resources (Full-time equivalents—FTEs)

2014-20152015-20162016-2017
230 230 230

 

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome: Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system
Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services2011-2012 Expenditures2012-2013 Expenditures2013-2014 Forecast Spending2014-2015 Main Estimates2014-2015 Planned Spending2015-2016 Planned Spending2016-2017 Planned Spending
Economic Regulation 12,918,028 12,878,593 12,741,210 11,760,711 12,336,421 12,063,455 12,120,267
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 8,190,454 8,337,217 9,032,631 8,978,297 9,405,216 9,176,482 9,211,730
Strategic Outcome Subtotal 21,108,482 21,215,809 21,773,841 20,739,008 21,741,636 21,239,937 21,331,996

Internal Services

Subtotal

8,199,205 7,485,034 7,744,900 6,911,614 7,259,015 6,933,315 6,841,256
Total 29,307,687 28,700,844 29,518,741 27,650,622 29,000,652 28,173,252 28,173,252

 

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014-2015 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending AreaNote 7 (dollars)
Strategic OutcomeProgramSpending AreaGovernment of Canada Outcome2014-2015 Planned Spending
Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system Economic Regulation Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplaceNote 8 12,336,421
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 9,405,216
Internal Services 7,259,015

 

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending AreaTotal Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 29,000,652
Social Affairs N/A
International Affairs N/A
Government Affairs N/A

 

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

The spending amounts presented in the chart for fiscal years 2011-2012 to 2012-2013 are actual results as presented in the Public Accounts of Canada. Spending in fiscal year 2012-2013 was lower than the previous year primarily due to the reduction of payments related to the payout of severance pay and termination benefits to some employees.

Forecast spending for fiscal year 2013-2014 is $29.5 million.  This assessment is based on the total available authorities plus an estimated amount of $1.5 million for the reimbursement of eligible paylist expenditures as we can forecast with some certainty the amounts to be paid.

Finally, for the period including the 2014-2015 to 2016-2017 fiscal years, total planned spending is lower than that of previous years, as we consider that the majority of the payouts for severance pay and termination benefits related to the latest collective agreements will have been made.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Canadian Transportation Agency's organizational appropriations, please see the 2014-2015 Main Estimates publication.Note 9

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

The Canadian Transportation Agency also ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA).  An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system

The Canadian Transportation Agency is both an economic regulator and a quasi-judicial tribunal.  It regulates certain aspects of the national transportation network through the administration of laws and regulations.  It also influences industry behaviour through voluntary codes of practice, and education and outreach programs.  It adjudicates disputes between users of, service providers within, and others affected by the national transportation system, which, in the case of accessibility, includes extra-provincial bus services.

To successfully deliver its strategic outcome, the Agency divides its activities under three program headings: economic regulation, adjudication and alternative dispute resolution, and internal services.

Performance Measurement
Performance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be Achieved
Percentage of satisfaction with economic regulation and dispute resolution servicesNote 10 70% April 2017

 

Program 1: Economic Regulation

Description: The Agency supports an efficient and accessible federal transportation system for users, service providers and other stakeholders through economic regulation of federal air, rail and marine transportation.  It regulates air transportation by enforcing the Canada Transportation Act and related regulations, administering a licensing and charter permit system, helping to negotiate air bilateral agreements, and ensuring that terms and conditions of carriage of air carriers are consistent with Canadian legislation.  It develops regulations, codes of practice, and educational and outreach programs to ensure that undue obstacles to the mobility of persons with disabilities are removed from the federal transportation network. It regulates the federal rail system by issuing certificates of fitness allowing carriers to operate, approving rail line construction, overseeing the discontinuance of service, establishing the net salvage value of rail lines, and it determines interswitching rates and administers the revenue cap for the movement of Western grain.  It acts as an economic regulator in marine transportation by determining whether suitable Canadian vessels are available when applications are made to use foreign vessels.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-2015
Main Estimates
2014-2015
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
11,760,315 12,336,421 12,063,455 12,120,267

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-20152015-20162016-2017
99 99 99

 

Performance Measurement
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be Achieved
Service providers (air, rail and marine) comply with regulatory requirements Air carriers and facility operators comply with the regulatory requirements within 85 business days of the periodic inspection 95% Ongoing
Licensees/facility operators who have been found in contravention of the regulatory requirements and are brought into compliance following a periodic inspection remain compliant 85% April 2018
Level of compliance with targetedNote 11 regulations and voluntary codes of practice Regulations
85%
Codes of practice
65%
April 2017
CN and CP are provided with the information required to ensure they do not exceed the maximum grain revenue entitlements for the shipment of Western Grain Number of times that either CN or CP has exceeded their respective Western Grain revenue cap entitlement by more than 1% over the last three years One time or fewer out of six times April 2017

 

Planning Highlights

In 2014-2015, the Agency will focus on:

  • renewing regulations and non-regulatory tools to increase efficiency and reduce regulatory burden, including a renewal of the Air Transportation Regulations, the Uniform Classification of Accounts, and the rates for the Guide to Railway Charges for Maintenance and Construction of Road Crossings;
  • updating regulations and codes of practice related to accessibility, in consultation with its Accessibility Advisory Committee, using innovative technology solutions;
  • addressing client and stakeholder feedback to enhance engagement and the timely exchange of business-critical information required by the public and industry;
  • actively contributing to legislative and policy reviews affecting the Agency's mandate, including the review of Railway Third Party Liability Insurance Coverage Regulations; and
  • enhancing compliance with regulations, decisions, and orders through risk-based approaches, strategic monitoring, targeted education and outreach activities, and holding non-compliant companies accountable.

Program 2: Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Description: The Agency provides formal and informal dispute resolution services to users, service providers and others affected by the federal transportation network.  As a quasi-judicial tribunal, the Agency has the authority to issue adjudicative decisions and orders on matters within its jurisdiction over federal rail, air and marine modes of transportation and, in respect of the Agency's accessibility mandate, extra-provincial bus operations.  It resolves disputes between: air travellers and air carriers regarding terms and conditions of air carriage; persons with disabilities and service providers regarding undue obstacles to the mobility of such persons within the federal transportation network; rail shippers and railway companies regarding level of service and other matters; municipalities, road authorities, landowners and railways regarding rail infrastructure; individuals and communities affected by rail noise and vibration and railways; Canadian ship owners and other interested persons regarding coasting trade and pilotage and port authorities regarding charges for pilotage services or port fees.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-2015
Main Estimates
2014-2015
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
8,978,938 9,405,216 9,176,482 9,211,730

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-20152015-20162016-2017
72 72 72

 

Performance Measurement
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsDate to be Achieved
Specialized transportation dispute resolution that is transparent, fair and timely Percentage of dispute resolution service standards achievedNote 12 70% April 2017

 

Planning Highlights

In 2014-2015, the Agency will focus on:

  • reengineering its approach to case management to simplify dispute resolution processes, increase responsiveness and enable paperless, automated processing;
  • implementing the Agency's new rules of procedure for adjudicating disputes;
  • addressing performance gaps and client satisfaction feedback in an efficient and open manner;
  • providing consumers and industry with the information they need, through the communication vehicles they use; and
  • enhancing dialogue and the exchange of business-critical information with consumers and industry.

Internal Services

Description: Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-2015
Main Estimates
2014-2015
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
6,911,370 7,259,015 6,933,315 6,841,256

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-20152015-20162016-2017
59 59 59

 

Planning Highlights

In 2014-2015, the Agency will focus on:

  • transitioning to shared federal government service delivery models while maintaining service continuity;
  • reinforcing rigorous governance and oversight to enhance project management and accountability;
  • supporting employee excellence through performance management, continuous learning and professional development;
  • increasing employee engagement by regularly soliciting and responding to input and feedback; and
  • preserving and enhancing business-critical expertise and information.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the Canadian Transportation Agency's operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues are prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management. 

Because the future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ. 

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the Canadian Transportation Agency's website.Note 13

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations  
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)
Financial informationEstimated Results 2013-2014Planned Results
2014-2015
Change
Total expenses 33,322,000 33,012,000 (310,000)
Total revenues 0 0 0
Net cost of operations  33,322,000 33,012,000 (310,000)

 

As shown in the table above, the Agency is projecting a net operating cost of $33 million. This projection is based on funding requested in the 2014-2015 Main Estimates. The forecast decrease in expenses in 2014-2015 of $0.3 million is primarily due to the estimated reduction of the payouts for severance pay and termination benefits related to the most recent collective agreements.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014-2015 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Canadian Transportation Agency's website.Note 14

  • Greening Government Operations
  • Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluationsover the next three fiscal years

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and EvaluationsNote 15 publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For more information, please visit the Agency's websiteNote 16 or contact the Agency at:

Canadian Transportation Agency
15 Eddy Street
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0N9
Tel: 1-888-222-2592
Fax: 819-997-6727
TTY: 1-800-669-5575
Email: info@otc-cta.gc.ca

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